Connect Atari to modern TV sets

Connect Atari to modern TV sets

Television standards have changed in a few ways since 1977, when Atari released the Atari 2600. Even if you have a CRT from the 1990s, it might not have an obvious place to hook it up. But it’s possible to connect Atari to modern TV sets. Here’s how.

Today you can buy a flashback console that contains a selection of games and uses a more modern connection method. But your favorite games may not be on that device, and using the vintage hardware with the decades-old cartridges does feel more authentic, even if you don’t have it set up in a wood-paneled room with a big console TV anymore.

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Commodore 64 motherboard revisions

Commodore 64 motherboard revisions

Commodore made the C-64 for about 11 years, so it’s probably no surprise they went through several Commodore 64 motherboard revisions during that time. Collectors enjoy the challenge of trying to get a machine with each type and revision of board, and knowing the characteristics of each board can help someone puzzle out the history of a machine, such as whether it had been repaired in the past.

Commodore made a lot of changes to the 64’s outward appearance over the years, but they made a lot of changes internally as well. This helped them drive the price down from $595 to $149 over the course of about three years.

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Can SNES play NES games? No. Here’s why.

Can SNES play NES games? No. Here’s why.

Can SNES play NES games? That question is older than the SNES itself. But the two systems aren’t backward compatible, unfortunately. There are modern options that are, however. More on that in a minute.

There are physical limitations that prevent an NES cartridge from even fitting in an SNES. But there was a technical reason to make the two physically incompatible. Even if the cartridge would fit, it wouldn’t work.

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Commodore 1541 disk drive: Slow. Unreliable. Cheap enough.

Commodore 1541 disk drive: Slow. Unreliable. Cheap enough.

The Commodore 1541 disk drive was the most common Commodore 64 floppy drive. Commodore fans from the 1980s loved to hate it. It was the first disk drive priced low enough to gain mainstream acceptance. But it was slow and loud and unreliable.

We put up with it anyway. A home computer was a luxury in those days and most of us had some idea how lucky we were to live through that time and experience it firsthand.

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