Who makes Insinkerator garbage disposals?

Who makes Insinkerator garbage disposals?

Insinkerator is a venerable and popular brand of garbage disposal you can find at at almost any hardware or home improvement store. You can find one at almost any price point you want, whether you want to spend tens of dollars or hundreds. But who makes Insinkerator garbage disposals?

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How easily can someone hack my home computer and steal personal information?

On Monday, March 13 at approximately 10:30 AM CST, I will be appearing on KFUO Radio’s Faith and Family program to discuss home computer security with host Andy Bates. Here’s the scariest question he’s planning to ask: How easily can someone hack my home computer and steal personal information?

Someone asked me that question at work once, except it was about a work computer. I whipped out a copy of a book about Metasploit, flipped to page 137, and started reading. My point was that I could teach this guy how. He didn’t take it well, so I don’t recommend doing that.

My point that I could teach this guy how to do it still stands, though. And I think I could teach Andy how too.

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Londontoy: Canada’s answer to Tootsietoy

Londontoy: Canada’s answer to Tootsietoy

Years ago at an estate sale in St. Louis’ Central West End, I bought a number of Tootsietoy vehicles. When I got home, I noticed some had only the word “toy,” a number, and “Made in USA” inside. That was weird. These weren’t Tootsietoys. They were Londontoys.

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Where Lionel trains are made

Lionel is an iconic American brand, and I often hear people refer to it as a made-in-the-USA company. But it’s been a long time since that’s been where Lionel trains are made. Or at least the majority.

It turns out Lionel has a bit of a history with that.

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Marx vs. Lionel

In the 1950s, Marx and Lionel took turns being the biggest toy company in the world, largely riding on the popularity of O gauge trains. Neither company particularly liked the other, but both owed some degree of their success to being compatible with one another. Because of their interoperability, the two makes of trains are frequently compared and contrasted even today.

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What size and voltage to use for Lionel train light sockets

Lionel used 15 different types of light bulbs in its O gauge electric trains in the postwar era, but in most cases–87% of catalog numbers, and a lot more than that in actual number of items produced–you can get by with two.

Lionel almost always specified 14 or 18 volts. Using an 18-volt bulb in place of a 14-volt original, or a 22-volt bulb in place of an 18-volt original results in longer service life. And there were two base types that Lionel used more than any other. Read more

The trade off of fidelity and convenience in marketing, and how it doomed my favorite company

I’m reading a book called Trade-Off, by former USA Today technology columnist Kevin Maney. It’s primarily a marketing book.

Maney argues that all products are a balance of fidelity and convenience, and highly favor one or the other. He additionally argues that failed products fail because they attempted to achieve both, or failed to focus on either one.

An example of a convenient product is an economy car. They’re inexpensive to buy and inexpensive to keep fueled up, but don’t have much glitz and you probably won’t fall in love with it. A high-end sports car or luxury car is a lot less practical, but you’re a lot more likely to fall in love with it, and gain prestige by driving around town in it. Read more

Webcam spying gets more attention

So, apparently Miss Teen USA’s computer got infected with a webcam-spying remote access trojan. So someone got some sneaky pictures of her, and tried to blackmail her. Fortunately, instead, she decided to talk about it.

This is good. The majority of people don’t take computer security seriously enough. This could get some people talking, finally.

Unfortunately, the one effective technique against something like this–application whitelisting–isn’t available for the home versions of Windows. Most people think of application whitelisting is a corporate thing, but a signature-based whitelist would keep this kind of software from running on a home PC, which is the target for webcam snooping. Home users need it too. And unfortunately, it’s the people who are most likely to buy the cheaper home version who need it the most. Are you listening, Microsoft?

In the meantime, keep a piece of tape on your webcams, I guess.

But maybe now that Miss Teen USA is running around the talk show circuit talking about this stuff, people will start thinking that maybe, just maybe, bad stuff doesn’t always just happen to other people’s computers. Because it doesn’t.

As a security professional, I’m glad for anything that raises awareness. Because security awareness is one of the DSD Top 35 migitations–it’s #20. And of the 35, it’s the hardest to buy.

And if you’re not scared enough yet, it’s possible to do webcam spying not only with a laptop, but also with a smart TV. It’s a little harder with smart TVs because they’re all a little different, but nobody thinks about their smart TV, and the manufacturers rarely, if ever update them to fix security bugs. Fortunately, TV hacking is, as far as we know, more in the realm of theory right now than active exploitation, but it’s only a matter of time before that changes. The time to pressure manufacturers–or just stop buying smart TVs–is now.

Why Amazon can’t make a Kindle in the USA

Dan Bowman sent over this ongoing series at Forbes. I’d seen the first couple of parts of it, but didn’t realize it was still ongoing. In light of new Amazon tablet rumors, it takes on new relevance.

It’s a thought-provoking look at the state of U.S. manufacturing today, and the state of management. I don’t know if the author thinks it’s too late to reverse this decline, but presumably no. Otherwise he wouldn’t be writing it, probably.
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