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Marx 41850 train set: The Mohawk

In 1974, Marx introduced a diesel freight train set it called The Mohawk, catalog , that ran on AC electric power and sold through catalog retailers. If you have a Marx 41850 train set today, it’s worth considerably more than its original retail price, even adjusted for inflation.

Marx’s Mohawk train set was part of the Great American Railroads series. It had catalog number 41850 and was manufactured only in 1974. Today it is one of the most valuable Marx train sets ever made.

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Marx Eagle Express Diesel Freight train set 7360

In 1974, Marx introduced a diesel freight set it called the Eagle Express, catalog , that ran on AC electric power and sold through catalog retailers. If you have one today, it’s worth considerably more than its original retail price, even adjusted for inflation.

The Marx Eagle Express train set was part of the Great American Railroads series. It had catalog number 7360 and was manufactured only in 1974, though the inventory lasted years longer.

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Marx 553 tank car

The Marx 553 tanker was Marx’s longest running 6-inch tank car, running from way back in 1935 to 1956. It came in three major variants, one on each side of World War II, and one spanning the two eras by a few years.Read More »Marx 553 tank car

A cheap home alternative to electroplating

After decades of hard play, the shiny tin plating on old electric train parts can wear off, leaving a dull surface that doesn’t look great, and is prone to rust. You can get plating kits so you can replate the parts, but the kits are expensive and can involve chemicals you don’t necessarily want to keep laying around. Here is an inexpensive alternative to replating that you can do at home to restore old tin parts.

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Lionel scenic plots

Lionel scenic plots debuted in 1927 with the #195 illuminated terrace, a 19×22 inch platform built to provide a landscape for three houses, two #56 lamp posts, and a #90 flag pole.

The plot, and the various others that followed, solved two problems. They provided instant scenery for temporary floor layouts, and instant scenery for more permanent layouts for those who didn’t have the ability or confidence to attempt to scenic their layout themselves.

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What the build dates on Lionel trains mean

Here’s a question that comes up from time to time on train forums. What do the build dates on Lionel trains mean? In the Lionel postwar era, not a lot. At least not if you’re looking to figure out the actual age of the model.

The build dates on Lionel postwar trains, and largely for MPC-era trains as well, indicate when the model was first released, not when the example you hold in your hands was built.

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Set up a Marx train set

If you’ve lost the original instructions, it’s certainly not obvious how to connect a Marx transformer to track and otherwise set up a Marx train set. Especially if someone else always set it up. But don’t be intimidated. It’s low voltage wiring. And it can be as few as two connections. Here’s how to set up a vintage Louis Marx electric train set.

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