The IBM PS/1 (or IBM PS1)

The IBM PS/1, sometimes called the IBM PS1, was a line of 1990s personal computer systems, not to be confused with the Sony Playstation video game console that’s also often called the PS1. The PS/1 was IBM’s second attempt at a mass market consumer PC.

You can neatly divide the PS/1 into two generations. While they ran the same software, they had major philosophical differences. Perhaps more than any other computer line, they represent IBM’s change of heart in the early 1990s as it tried to survive in an extremely competitive and crowded market.

First generation IBM PS/1

IBM PS/1, or IBM PS1
First-generation IBM PS/1s were easy to set up but competing computers were a lot more expandable. More importantly, other brands could use a third-party monitor if you wanted something cheaper or bigger.

The first IBM PS/1s emphasized ease of setup and use. They weren’t very expandable, and they stored IBM PC DOS in ROM, much like a Tandy 1000. This made them fast, but then you lost the benefit if you wanted to upgrade to a later version of DOS.

Technically, the PS/1 had an industry standard ISA architecture. From a practical standpoint it didn’t make much difference. Aside from adding memory or swapping the hard drive, you didn’t have much in the way of options for expanding or upgrading it.  Making matters worse, IBM put the power supply in the monitor. This gave you a more compact and easy to set up system, but it meant you had to use an IBM monitor.

Consumers in the early 1990s shied away from IBM, fearing vendor lock-in. The first generation IBM PS/1 line didn’t do anything to really help that. It was cheaper than a PS/2. But other mass-market PCs, such as Packard Bell, were a lot more expandable and you could mix and match parts more readily. They were also cheaper. If you wanted higher quality, companies like AST, Compaq, and Dell were getting into mass market retail too.

Second generation IBM PS/1

IBM PS/1 or IBM PS1 second gen
This second generation IBM PS/1 was standard in every way. But thanks to the stigma from the PS/2 and first generation PS/1, I had a hard time selling them.

Second-generation IBM PS1 computers were much more mainstream. The computer had its own power supply like everyone else’s. They used standard LPX form factor motherboards, standard IDE hard drives, loaded DOS from disk, and had ISA expansion slots. Aside from the logo in the front, they looked, worked, and acted just like any other PC.

In 1993, I bought another Amiga enthusiast’s Amiga stuff. He had upgraded to an IBM PS/1. Another buddy gave him his old PC magazines. He told me he was excited to see the PS/1 on the cover of one of them. He quickly learned his PS/1 was nothing like the PS/1 in the magazine, but he told me he was relieved.

My experience selling IBM PS/1s

Soon after, I got a job selling computers at Best Buy. We sold Packard Bell, Acer, Dell, Compaq, and IBM computers. Each product line ranged from a 25 or 33 MHz 486SX to a 66 MHz 486DX2. The only differences between them were price and quality. Dell, Compaq and IBM all offered above average quality. Acer offered average quality and Packard Bell was below average. Price-wise, Dell was average. Packard Bell and Acer were below average. Compaq and IBM were above average.

But IBM was a hard sell. For a few weeks that summer, the cheapest non-Packard Bell computer we had was an IBM 486SX running at 33 MHz. We still had a hard time selling them. People would walk right past that machine and pay more for a comparable Dell or Compaq.

Why? People thought they were locked in if they bought IBM.

The only time IBM was an easy sell was if someone had an IBM at work. If you had an IBM at work and wanted something IBM compatible, a true-blue IBM seemed like a safer choice. But the longer the 90s wore on, the less likely this became.

How the PS/1 could have sold better

Based on what I know now, I would have displayed IBM PS1s with Sony or NEC monitors instead of IBM. Displaying an IBM with a Microsoft keyboard and Logitech mouse would have been misleading since an IBM keyboard and mouse came in the box. But I would have kept one of each handy so I could demonstrate that I could plug them in and they would work.

For that matter, if IBM had provided a PS/1 with a clear acrylic case for display purposes so we could show them everything we sold in the store would work with it, we would have sold a lot more of them. I don’t think it was enough for IBM to just reform. They needed to show they’d reformed and embraced industry standards.

IBM probably also would have done better if they’d done a better job with industrial design. I sold as many Thinkpads as I sold PS/1s. The only Thinkpad we had in stock was our most expensive laptop. But it had a striking industrial design, a comfortable keyboard, a smooth trackpoint device and a bright, clear screen. It was as distinctive then as Apple laptops are today. A bold, Thinkpad-like approach might not have saved the PS/1, but it’s hard to imagine it faring any worse.

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