All posts tagged adobe

Web browser plugins you need to uninstall now–even if you have a Mac

I’ve been seeing a lot of news this week about web browser plugins getting exploited to plant malware on computer systems. A lot of people know to keep Flash up to date, and to keep Java up to date or uninstall it–at least I hope so by now–but there are two targets that people generally […]

Time to update Flash again. This is a big one.

There’s an exploit in Flash, on all platforms, being actively exploited in the wild. Adobe rushed out an update. See more at Ars Technica. It allows remote code execution, so this one is as bad as it gets. Installing EMET is a potential mitigation against Flash exploits, so if you’re running Windows, protecting Flash with […]

Things to do for your relatives’ computers this Christmas

I wish I’d posted this last week, since many of us see one set of relatives at Thanksgiving and a different set at Christmas (and perhaps New Year’s). Here are things you can do as preventative maintenance for relatives whose computers could use a little help.

How to make an LG LD301EL dehumidifier drain the water out of a hose instead of the bucket

I recently came into possession of an LG LD301EL dehumidifier. It was supposed to be draining out of the hose, but it wasn’t. I figured out why. If you have one of these or a similar dehumidifier, chances are you have the same problem. The instructions on the back of the dehumidifier aren’t as clear […]

I don’t think I agree with the argument against patching everything

Some revolutionary advice surfaced this past week–stop patching everything. And while I understand the argument that people need to stop letting the difficulty of patching everything paralyze them and cause them to do nothing–as I’ve seen some organizations do–and I agree that some patches are more critical than others, as someone who once had to […]

Reports of the Droidpocalypse have been greatly exaggerated

I was listening to the excellent Risky Business analysis of the Droidpocalypse¬† this week, and I’m happy to report that the vulnerability that affects 90% of Android devices ever made, while serious, is vastly overstated.

The explanation about Windows vs. Linux kernel performance makes sense

An anonymous Microsoft developer spilled some juicy opinions about why Windows kernel performance isn’t all it could be. Although he has recanted much of what he said, some of his insights make a ton of sense.

The trouble with bringing your own software

PC Magazine is advocating a bring your own laptop, with your own software approach to business. It likens it to mechanics who bring their own tools. The trouble is that while mechanical tools in a toolbox operate autonomously and don’t interfere with one another, software residing on a computer does.

The ethics of writing nefarious security instructions

This week I posted a link to a video showing how to crack a WPS-enabled wifi network, and this week, Ars Technica wrote a firsthand account of cracking a password list. I’m sure this raises questions of ethics in some people’s minds. To be honest, spreading this kind of information makes me a little uncomfortable […]

Welcome, Tony’s Kansas City readers

Thanks to Tony’s Kansas City for the link this morning. Tony noted that “Security dude reminds us that Google Fiber could kill the software industry.” That’s an interesting spin. I do think it will affect the software industry–but so long as Kansas City stays at the forefront and the rest of the country is content […]